Scaffolding Website

UPDATED THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2002 4:41 PM ETEDUC 0500 - Adolescent Learning and Development

 

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Scaffolding   Research Papers              

Scaffolding as a Teaching Strategy
By Rachel Van Der Stuyf   
Scaffolding instruction as a teaching strategy originates from Lev Vygotsky’s sociocultural theory and his concept of the zone of proximal development (ZPD).  “The zone of proximal development is the distance between what children can do by themselves and the next learning that they can be helped to achieve with competent assistance."  The scaffolding teaching strategy provides individualized support based on the learner’s ZPD.  In scaffolding instruction a more knowledgeable other provides scaffolds or supports to facilitate the learner’s development.  The scaffolds facilitate a student’s ability to build on prior knowledge and internalize new information. The activities provided in scaffolding instruction are just beyond the level of what the learner can do alone.  The more capable other provides the scaffolds so that the learner can accomplish (with assistance) the tasks that he or she could otherwise not complete, thus helping the learner through the ZPD.

Teaching Strategy: Exploring Scaffolding
By Elvani Pennil
True learning occurs when information is integrated into an individual's knowledge base.  According to Graves and Braaten, scaffolding is defined as the process by which an expert provides temporary support to learners to "help bridge the gap between what [the learner] know[s] and can do and what [he or she] need[s] to accomplish in order to succeed at a particular learning task."

Educational Concept of Scaffolding
By Latoya A. Henry
Scaffolding is a process that requires direct teaching and monitoring by an adult. To be successful with this teaching strategy, the teacher must provide all information that a student needs to complete a given task.  Detailed advice, direction of the student’s attention, and alerts to the student of the sequence of activities are essential to a student’s ability to perform within the scaffolded teaching environment. Gradually, with scaffolding, children are able to direct their own attention, plan, and control their activities.

Scaffolding as a Teaching Strategy

By Linda Lawson
When most of us hear the word “scaffolding” we think of new office buildings going up, or else aging skyscrapers needing repair. Scaffolding is what gets erected outside a tall building so that workers can climb up and hammer away. From the ground below scaffolding sometimes looks like an external skeleton, yet any long gaze will reveal it has nothing to do with supporting the actual weight of the building it surrounds. Instead, what is evident is the short-lived nature of its framework, individual pieces of which are designed to disassemble quickly. Frequent passersby spot regular changes in vertical and lateral movement. One day the scaffolding spreads north or retreats east; the next, it stretches higher or drops lower. Scaffolding in construction is a means to an end; as soon as it’s no longer needed, it disappears.

Instructional Scaffolding
By Verna Lange
Scaffolds are temporary structures that physically support workers while they complete jobs that would otherwise be impossible.  Scaffolds provide workers with both a place to work and the means to reach work areas that they could not access on their own.  Instructional scaffolding is a teaching strategy that was cleverly named for the practical resemblance it bears to the physical scaffolds used on construction sites.  The strategy consists of teaching new skills by engaging students collaboratively in tasks that would be too difficult for them to complete on their own.  The instructor initially provides extensive instructional support, or scaffolding, to continually assist the students in building their understanding of new content and process.  Once the students internalize the content and/or process, they assume full responsibility for controlling the progress of a given task.  The temporary scaffolding provided by the instructor is removed to reveal the impressive permanent structure of student understanding.

 

Instructional Scaffolding: Building a Better Education
By Joshua Stager
Scaffolds are temporary structures that physically support workers while they complete jobs that would otherwise be impossible.  Scaffolds provide workers with both a place to work and the means to reach work areas that they could not access on their own.  Instructional scaffolding is a teaching strategy that was cleverly named for the practical resemblance it bears to the physical scaffolds used on construction sites.  The strategy consists of teaching new skills by engaging students collaboratively in tasks that would be too difficult for them to complete on their own.  The instructor initially provides extensive instructional support, or scaffolding, to continually assist the students in building their understanding of new content and process.  Once the students internalize the content and/or process, they assume full responsibility for controlling the progress of a given task.  The temporary scaffolding provided by the instructor is removed to reveal the impressive permanent structure of student understanding.

 

Instructional Scaffolding
By Juan Cano


SCAFFOLDING:

LESSON PLAN OUTLINES

Personification

The Elements of a Short Story

Building a Better Education

Easy Addition

Metric Equivalents

Revision Strategies

Juan Cano



 

Microsoft PowerPoint(R) Presentations

Elements of the Short Story

Personification

building a better education

easy addition

metric equivalents

revision strategies

juan cano

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Juan Cano

Latoya Henry

Verna Lange

Linda Lawson

Elvani Pennil

Joshua Stager

Rachel Van Der Stuyf

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